"Do the thing that gets your heart racing and blood pumping and don’t let ANYONE tell you you can’t. "
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Reblogged from everyoneisgay  672 notes
everyoneisgay:

kylesar:

I don’t tell personal stories often, but when I do it’s probably for Everyone Is Gay.
My bosses + friends Kristin Russo and Dannielle Owens-Reid are just a few weeks from the official release of their book ‘This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids,’ and for every book pre-ordered, a copy will be donated to a local PFLAG chapter. We’d really like to reach all 350+ chapters, and do our part to give more parents and kids more tools to help create open, positive conversations and relationships. The personal feelz below are why this is so, so important to me.  
—
Almost four years ago, when I was a very anxious (and probably very depressed) 18-year-old, I stumbled upon a website that simultaneously made me laugh my ass off AND helped contextualize my experience within a larger community I had never before been exposed to, felt comfortable in, or realized I was a part of… and that shit helped me through some tough times. EveryoneIsGay.com was my safest space. 
Today, I am four months away from another graduation, and I have been fortunate enough to work with Dannielle and Kristin for over 6 months on the launch of The Parents Project among many other things—with no intention of stopping any time soon. Holding their freshly-printed book in my hands, while sitting in my own company’s new office space at the Fordham Foundry, overlooking the New York City neighborhood I ran away from my 18-year-old self to in 2011—and feeling truly proud and at home—is a really awesome feeling. 
Dannielle and Kristin’s work made a huge impact on my life before I ever met them, and it’s an amazing thing to feel like I’ve emerged on the other side of the confusion, anxiety, and fear that is all too common among kids who feel like they’re not “normal” with the amazing opportunity to pay it forward by supporting them in that work every day. These ladies had my back before they even knew me, and now they are some of my greatest personal supporters… and I have their backs, too, which is why I ask you to consider the following: 
Take a moment to learn more about this book, think about who you think it could help the most right now, and pre-order a copy—with the added bonus of knowing that another copy will be given to other people who desperately need it. At the very least, please share the link to spread the love. Thank you!!
http://theparentsproject.com/the-book/ 

*cry face emoji**4 million heart emojis*

everyoneisgay:

kylesar:

I don’t tell personal stories often, but when I do it’s probably for Everyone Is Gay.

My bosses + friends Kristin Russo and Dannielle Owens-Reid are just a few weeks from the official release of their book ‘This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids,’ and for every book pre-ordered, a copy will be donated to a local PFLAG chapter. We’d really like to reach all 350+ chapters, and do our part to give more parents and kids more tools to help create open, positive conversations and relationships. The personal feelz below are why this is so, so important to me.  

Almost four years ago, when I was a very anxious (and probably very depressed) 18-year-old, I stumbled upon a website that simultaneously made me laugh my ass off AND helped contextualize my experience within a larger community I had never before been exposed to, felt comfortable in, or realized I was a part of… and that shit helped me through some tough times. EveryoneIsGay.com was my safest space. 

Today, I am four months away from another graduation, and I have been fortunate enough to work with Dannielle and Kristin for over 6 months on the launch of The Parents Project among many other things—with no intention of stopping any time soon. Holding their freshly-printed book in my hands, while sitting in my own company’s new office space at the Fordham Foundry, overlooking the New York City neighborhood I ran away from my 18-year-old self to in 2011—and feeling truly proud and at home—is a really awesome feeling. 

Dannielle and Kristin’s work made a huge impact on my life before I ever met them, and it’s an amazing thing to feel like I’ve emerged on the other side of the confusion, anxiety, and fear that is all too common among kids who feel like they’re not “normal” with the amazing opportunity to pay it forward by supporting them in that work every day. These ladies had my back before they even knew me, and now they are some of my greatest personal supporters… and I have their backs, too, which is why I ask you to consider the following: 

Take a moment to learn more about this book, think about who you think it could help the most right now, and pre-order a copy—with the added bonus of knowing that another copy will be given to other people who desperately need it. At the very least, please share the link to spread the love. Thank you!!

http://theparentsproject.com/the-book/ 

*cry face emoji*
*4 million heart emojis*

Reblogged from kaeandlucy  55,120 notes

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain. By Jonathan Carroll (via quotethat)

Reblogged from gabifresh  105,751 notes

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything. By

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

THAT’S THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR OWNING EVERYTHING

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

this is a super important explanation to think about whenever you feel like telling someone that something isn’t racist because you don’t hate x person.

(via robotsandfrippary)

I probably reblogged in the past, but here it is again in that case.

(via feministdisney)